Category Archives: Companion Planting

Companion Planting with Dill

Companion Planting: Dill.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Chromatography has been used to explain why some plants like or dislike being planted with other plants. It is possible to make a specific chromatographic test to find out why, or if at all, a plant is helping or hindering its neighbors. Chromatography has also been used to prove that plants do significantly better with compost than without.

A good companion plant for cabbage, improving its growth and vigor. Dill does not do well planted with carrots and will reduce the carrot crop. It can be sowed with cucumbers and lettuce often deterring the pests that frequent these plants.

Companion Planting: Daylily

Companion Planting: Daylily.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Chromatography has been used to explain why some plants like or dislike being planted with other plants. It is possible to make a specific chromatographic test to find out why, or if at all, a plant is helping or hindering its neighbors. Chromatography has also been used to prove that plants do significantly better with compost than without.

One little known fact about daylilies is that they are edible. Buds and blossoms can be sautéed in butter, added to squash dishes or tomato dishes. They can also be dipped in batter and deep fried like squash blossoms.

As a companion plant, they are good to plant on a hill to prevent erosion or on a slope that is too steep to mow.

Also read about Best Harvest Festivals in the U.S and China Asters in this month’s archived articles.

Companion Planting: Dandelions

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.
Chromatography has been used to explain why some plants like or dislike being planted with other plants. It is possible to make a specific chromatographic test to find out why, or if at all, a plant is helping or hindering its neighbors. Chromatography has also been used to prove that plants do significantly better with compost than without.

bee on dandelionThis “weed” is not the spurge of lawn owners like most of us think. Dandelions do not actually compete with grasses because their roots go much deeper than any grass, and because of this, their roots bring up nutrients from the deeper soils that grasses can benefit from. Also, the dandelion is the honeybee’s favorite flower.

However, dandelions do excrete an ethylene gas that stunts the growth of neighboring plants, but this very gas also causes nearby flowers and fruits to mature early. So, keep dandelions away from plants you don’t want stunted and keep them around other flowers and fruits.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Companion Planting: Chives

chivesPlants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Chromatography has been used to explain why some plants like or dislike being planted with other plants. It is possible to make a specific chromatographic test to find out why, or if at all, a plant is helping or hindering its neighbors. Chromatography has also been used to prove that plants do significantly better with compost than without.

Chives are good companion plants for carrots and will improve their growth and flavor. Chives are also beneficial if planted around the base of fruit trees in an orchard to deter mice and to prevent apple scab.
Make a tea of chives to spray on cucumbers, apples and gooseberry against powdery mildew.

Companion Planting: Chervil

chervilPlants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Chervil is one of the few herbs that grows better in shade, so planting it among taller plants is beneficial. It does not take well to being transplanted, so pick your spot and direct seed it in the spring. It is a good companion plant to radishes and will improve their growth and flavor.

The leaves resemble parsley in appearance and taste, with delicate overtones of anise.  Sow seeds directly into the gardenabout three to four weeks before the last spring frost and again in late summer; thin seedlings to 6 to 9 inches apart.

Companion Planting: Celery

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

celery plantsCelery grows will with cauliflower, leeks, tomatoes and cabbage and seems to be mutually beneficial with bush beans. Cabbage butterflies are repelled if celery is planted near cauliflower or other cabbage plants.

Both celery and celeriac are reported to have a hormone similar to insulin which makes them an excellent seasoning for diabetics and since celery is high in natural salts, it is good for anyone on a salt-restricted diet as well.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Companion Planting: Chamomile and Identifying Two Types.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

chamomile german vs romanChamomile:

There are two types of chamomile: German or wild chamomile can be distinguished from the Roman chamomile by the hollow bottom of its blossom. An excellent companion plant to cabbages and onions, chamomile with improve the growth of both.

Wheat grown with small amounts of chamomile will grow heavier and fuller ears.

Chamomile flowers can be used in a dog’s bed against fleas. Put the flowers in the stuffing of the bed. The blossoms soaked in water can be used as a spray to treat plant diseases like damping off in greenhouses and cold frames.

Photo: German chamomile is on the left, Roman on the right. German also has a more upright stem with many flowers on a multi-branched stem. Roman has a vining habit with only one flower at the end of a stem.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Plants that add Lime (Calcium) to your Soil Naturally.

Companion Planting:

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Plants that add Lime (Calcium) to your Soil Naturally:

buckwheatThere’s nothing more nutritious or beautiful than a field full of Buckwheat. A honey bee’s favorite flower as well.

Buckwheat stores calcium, so when it’s composted or tilled under as a green manure it will add lime to your soil.
Lupine has very deep roots so it reaches the deep calcium in the soil. They do well in poor, gravelly areas so planting them there will help enrich the soil over time.
Melon leaves are rich in lime, so add them to your compost pile when the plants are done for the season.

Peas, beans, cabbages and turnips do well in soil containing lime.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Companion Planting: Calendula or Marigolds.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Public domain image, royalty free stock photo from www.public-domain-image.comCalendula or Marigolds:

Very beneficial when planted with potatoes, strawberries, roses and many bulbs to discourage nematodes. Marigolds produce a chemical that they release into the soil which kills nematodes. In order to be effective, marigolds should be planted for a long enough period of time in one spot since it takes a while for them to produce this chemical. Grow them all season in an area where you intend to plant one of the plants listed above. You may not notice immediate results after the first year, but you should notice a dramatic reduction in nematodes in subsequent years. The effects of marigold planting will last 2-3 years after they are no longer growing in that spot.

Marigolds planted with beans will protect the beans against Mexican bean beetles.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Companion Planting: Cabbage.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

CabbageCabbage.

All members of the cabbage family do well planted with aromatic herbs such as celery, dill, camomile, sage, mints and rosemary. Hyssop, thyme, wormwood and southernwood help to repel the white cabbage butterfly which lays eggs that turn into cabbage worms.

Do not plant members of the cabbage family with tomatoes, pole beans or strawberries. But they will do well with potatoes, beets and onions.

If cabbage or broccoli does not form good heads, it is a sign that lime, phosphorus or potash are needed in the soil.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.