Category Archives: Companion Planting

Companion Planting with Broccoli.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.<

Broccoli close-upBroccoli.

All members of the cabbage family do well planted with aromatic herbs such as celery, dill, camomile, sage, mints and rosemary.

Do not plant broccoli with tomatoes, pole beans or strawberries. It will do well with potatoes, beets and onions.

If you use pyrethrum spray on broccoli, do so before the flower heads open.

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Companion Planting: Black Nightshade.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

black-nightshadeBlack Nightshade (Solanaceae).

Members of the nightshade family draw the Colorado potato beetle away from potatoes because they prefer the weed, even though it is poisonous. The beetles eat it and die. It’s also said that nightshade will grow when the soil is too exhausted or malnourished to grow root crops.

Members of the nightshade family include: eggplant, belladonna, bittersweet, capiscum, jimson weed, petunia, potato, snakeberry, tobacco and tomato.

 

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Companion Planting with Birch Betula. (Gray Birch)

Betula_gray-birch

Dr. Ehrenfried Pfeiffer, one of the early advocates of the Bio-Dynamic Method of farming and gardening observed that compost piles benefitted from birch roots which excrete a substance that encourages fermentation. Even if the roots of the birch tree penetrate the compost pile, the compost suffers no loss of nutrients due to the added benefit of the gray birch.

It is recommended that you keep your compost pile at least six feet away from the trunk of the tree however, so as not to cause the the tree trunk or roots to rot.

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Companion Planting for Beets.

beets

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Beets Beta vulgaris.

Beets grow well near bush beans but do not like pole beans. They also do well with onions or kohlrabi. Lettuce and most members of the cabbage family are good companions for beets but field mustard and charlock inhibit their growth.

Companion Planting: Beans (Phaseolus and Vicia).

bean plants-corn

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

There are many different types of beans, but basically all will thrive when interplanted with carrots, beets and cauliflower and aid cucumbers and cabbages to grow.

Marigolds in bean rows will help to repel the Mexican bean beetle. Summer savory will improve the growth of beans and also deter bean beetles. Savory is also tasty to cook with beans.

Beans are inhibited in their growth by any member of the onion family, including garlic, shallots and chives. They also do not like being planted near gladiolus.

Broad beans are excellent companions to corn, vining up the stalks for support. The heavy vine growth may inhibit raccoons, or at least slow them up a bit when they get tangled in the vines trying to get at the corn. In turn, the beans add nitrogen to the soil for the corn which is a heavy feeder and requires a lot of nitrogen.

Bush Beans planted with potatoes will protect them against the Colorado potato beetle. In return the potatoes protect the beans from the Mexican bean beetle. This seems to work best when the beans and potatoes are planted in alternate rows. Bush beans do well planted with cucumbers which they are mutually beneficial with, as well as strawberries, with both growing more rapidly than when planted alone.

Pole Beans also do well with corn, but dislike kohlrabi and sunflower. Radishes and pole beans seem to derive a mutual benefit from each other.

Since beans and corn have the same growing season, sun and temperature requirements, they can be planted together at the same time of year.

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Companion Planting: Basil.

basil_plantCompanion Planting: Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Basil (Ocimum basilicum). Not only is this a prized plant for any cook’s kitchen, this culinary herb makes for a very good garden companion plant as well because it’s very aromatic and will drive many types of bugs away. It benefits tomatoes against insects and disease, and some people claim it improves their flavor. You would have to be the judge of that.

Basil also repels flies and mosquitos, so its a human companion plant as well. Plant it in several pots on your patio where you usually sit.

Growing: There are numerous varieties of basil and they all will do the trick. Basil does better in pots rather than planted in the garden as it will usually get chewed up by slugs if planted in the dirt. In a pot, it has very few pests. Keep the soil semi moist and place the pots among select plants to act as a companion plant.

Companion Planting: Landscaping plants.

Companion Planting: Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Good plants for landscaping: Azaleas, holly and rhododendrons are good companions for a landscape planting because they like acid soil with humus.
DO NOT plant azaleas or rhododendrons near black walnut trees because a substance called juglone washed from the leaves of black walnuts is detrimental to them.

Bay: Bay Laurel leaves put in stored grain bins or containers such as wheat, rice, rye, beans, oats and corn will eliminate weevils. Bay belongs to the same family as cinnamon, camphor, avocado and sassafras.

Companion Planting with Asparagus.


Companion Planting: Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests.

Asparagus officinalis:

Parsley planted with asparagus gives added vigor to both. Asparagus also does well with basil as do tomatoes, which will protect asparagus from asparagus beetles.

Since asparagus usually is harvested well before tomatoes can be planted, harvest the asparagus spears in early spring, then plant tomatoes on both sides of the spears when they are no longer big enough to harvest. Spears the size of a pencil or smaller should be left to grow into fronds to feed the roots for next year. It’s these fronds that you will find the asparagus beetles on.

Companion Planting with Nasturtium.


Companion Planting: Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests.

Nasturtium Tropaeolum:

Nasturtiums have beautiful flowers and a low, bushy habit. They do not get bigger than 24 inches and make an attractive decorative plant in borders and hanging pots, but they also make an effective companion plant.

Nasturtiums planted with squash will repel squash bugs, but the nasturtium must be started well before the squash in order to flower when you need them too since squash grows so fast. In a greenhouse, nasturtium will repel white flies and when planted next to broccoli will keep aphids away. This colorful benefactor will also benefit potatoes, radishes, cucumbers and any member of the cabbage family. When aphids see the yellow color of the nasturtium blossom they will avoid it. This is something to keep in mind since nasturtium come in several different colors from reds to oranges.

Also, did you know you can eat the leaves of the nasturtium plant? They have a slightly radishy flavor and are good in salads.

Companion Planting with Allium.

Companion Planting: Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests.

Allium Allium:

Allium is the Latin word for garlic and pertains to chives, garlic, leek, onion and shallots. There are also flowering allium that are excellent to plant among roses because they repel aphids and moles. Some of the larger varieties of flowering allium, such as Jewel of Tibet, grow to a height of five feet, and have a flower head up to eight inches in diameter that come in several colors.

Alliums are winter hardy, but should be mulched in colder climates. They like plenty of compost, but don’t like to by soggy. Plant onions, garlic and chives around the base of fruit trees to stop mice and moles from girdling them during the winter months when food is scarce or buried under a lot of snow. Girdling will kill trees, and rodents love to chew the bark of fruit trees like apples, cherries, peaches and plum when they are handy.

Garlic bulbs planted around plants that are prone to grub worms and cutworms will repel the worms, such as sunflowers and corn. Any member of the allium family will repel aphids.