Tag Archives: natural bug control

Companion Planting: Calendula or Marigolds.

Plants that assist each other to grow well, repel insects or even other plants when grown next to each other is called companion planting and can be a sustainable and eco-friendly way to improve and protect your garden against unwanted pests and disease.

Public domain image, royalty free stock photo from www.public-domain-image.comCalendula or Marigolds:

Very beneficial when planted with potatoes, strawberries, roses and many bulbs to discourage nematodes. Marigolds produce a chemical that they release into the soil which kills nematodes. In order to be effective, marigolds should be planted for a long enough period of time in one spot since it takes a while for them to produce this chemical. Grow them all season in an area where you intend to plant one of the plants listed above. You may not notice immediate results after the first year, but you should notice a dramatic reduction in nematodes in subsequent years. The effects of marigold planting will last 2-3 years after they are no longer growing in that spot.

Marigolds planted with beans will protect the beans against Mexican bean beetles.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Beneficial Insects: Tiger Beetle.

tiger_beetleOrder: Coleoptera. Family: Cicindelidae

Average Size: 1/2 to 3/4 inch.

Varying in color from metallic blue to a bronze color, green or purple, tiger beetles can run pretty fast with their long legs. Their prey of choice is ants, smaller beetles, grasshoppers and aphids. Because they run so quickly, you will probably not be able to spot one in the garden or elsewhere.

Tiger beetles are attracted to lights and warmth. They will sun themselves along roads, the edges of well-warn pathways and bare patches of soil or sand.

The larvae are shaped like an “S” and have a humped back and strong hooks on their abdomens that allow them to anchor themselves in the soil to seize prey which they drag back to their burrow to eat.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Beneficial Insects: Rove Beetles.

rove_beetleOrder: Coleoptera. Family: Staphylindae
Average Size: 1/16 to 3/4 inch.

Very similar to earwigs, but the Rove beetle has pinchers in the front jaws where earwigs have their pinchers as their tails.

Usually black or brown in color, rove beetles eat insects, where earwigs eat plants. Rove beetle larvae dine on aphids, fly eggs, maggots, mites, nematodes and springtails.

Rove beetles are usually found under refuse such as leaves, grass or bark and can be found on fungi or flowers and are common in compost piles. To keep them around, maintain a permanent bed of mulch or a stone path they can hide in.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.

Natural Insect and Disease Control: Kitchen Cures.

Salt sprinkled on slugs will reduce them to a glob of slime. Don’t use more than a couple shakes as salt in garden soil will kill many plants.

VLUU L100, M100  / Samsung L100, M100Coffee: A cup of strong coffee spray on plants can prevent the red spider mite. Coffee ground are high in nitrogen and will also benefit most soils greatly.

Horseradish mixed in water and used as a spray will repel potato bugs.

Cedar chips or sawdust: A tea made by soaking the chips or sawdust in hot water will keep away Mexican bean beetles, potato beetles, spider mites, mealybugs, cucumber and squash beetles. You can also just work the cedar into the dirt around plants for the same effect. Sprinkled on lawns the sawdust works well against chiggers.

Wood Ashes: Sprinkled around the base of plants will stop beetles, mites and aphids. Some people in certain areas claim wood ashes also work to repel deer, mice, cutworms, slugs and rabbits, being almost 80% effective.

Flour: dusted on cabbage plants after a rain or watering will cause worms to get all gummed up in the paste and dry out in the sun.

See our main gardening page, Garden Circkles, for much more information than what is posted on this blog, including full articles on greenhouse growing, sustainable and organic tips, beneficial bugs, the latest techniques such as aquaponics and vertical growing and much more.