April, 2014

Pet Circkles.

"I am in favor of animal rights as well as
human rights. That is the way of a
whole human being." ~ Abe Lincoln.

When a Cat Stops Eating, Time is Critical.

By Redstone Promotional Communications / Circkles.com.

Many animals and humans can go without food for a period of time without ill effect, but cats cannot. When a cat stops eating, or his normal daily caloric intake drops dramatically, it takes very little time before hepatic lipidosis, also known as fatty liver syndrome, takes over his liver, which can be fatal very quickly.
Middle-aged, overweight, and elderly cats are most likely to develop fatty liver syndrome (FLS) and cats that have recently lost a considerable amount of weight for some reason. In fatty liver syndrome the cat’s body, starved of sufficient calories, starts sending fat cells to the liver to convert to energy. However, feline bodies aren’t designed to metabolize fat in that manner, so the buildup of fat cells compromises liver function – a potentially fatal complication.

Cats with severe disease will need to be hospitalized and force-fed in order to recover. Preventing the condition should be the number one goal of every cat owner, which means as soon as a cat stops eating, it’s important to keep a very close watch on the situation and know when to make an immediate appointment with the veterinarian.

We see FLS most often when a cat owner decides to change the cat's food and the picky kitty simply refuses to eat the new diet. You need to be alert for a change in your cat's appetite and monitor it daily. If your kitty refuses to eat altogether, you need to get them to the veterinarian immediately. After a short time without food or adequate daily calories – a few days at most – a cat's body will begin sending fat cells to the liver to convert to energy.

Cats are designed by nature to kill small prey and eat it several times a day. They were not built to eat large meals or nibble constantly throughout the day. Being designed for an entirely carnivorous diet, cats are naturally very lean, active hunters, thus their bodies were never meant to store a lot of fat. This explains why cats' livers can't handle the fat metablization that occurs in response to being overweight, under-exercised, or a sudden loss of sufficient quantities of food.

With FLS, the buildup of fat cells in the liver prevents normal liver function. If left untreated, the liver ultimately fails and tragically, cats can and do die from this condition.


Symptoms of fatty liver syndrome include:
Anorexia
Dehydration
Excessive drooling (caused by nausea)
Vomiting
Weight loss
In the latter stages of the disease, we see lethargy, jaundice (yellowing of the skin), dramatic weight loss, and sometimes seizures.

There are many reasons why cats lose interest in food. It's very important to find out the underlying reason and treat the cause before hepatic lipidosis has a chance to develop.
Sometimes painful dental problems or social or emotional issues (for example, adding a new cat to the family) will cause a kitty to stop eating. And sometimes there are several things occurring simultaneously, so the goal is to sort all that out to determine the cause(s) of your cat's lack of appetite. Since we see this disease most often in obese cats who suddenly drop a significant amount of weight, needless to say, the best prevention is to not let your cat get fat in the first place.
And if your kitty is already heavy, it's extremely important not only that they lose weight, but that it's done very, very slowly.
A much better approach is to feed your cat appropriate nutrition in a set portion of calories served twice a day. It's much easier to maintain your cat's ideal body weight by feeding a precise number of calories in the morning and again in the evening rather than allowing them to munch on a bowl of food all day while you are at work. Also, because cats are carnivores by their very makeup, they do much better on raw meat or fish diets than on canned or dry food. A jar of tuna (yes there is a brand that comes in a jar, it's called TonNino) will last a cat about a week. Raw chicken is also good, just be sure to keep it fresh and only put out what your cat will eat in a couple hours so it does not spoil. Raw meat will usually cure any kitty that has lost it's appetite, and if it doesn't, take them to the vet right away because they are very sick.

When a dog doesn't seem hungry, it's safe enough to wait a day or two before considering calling the vet. If your cat's appetite trails off and you notice they are just nibbling at food, it's okay to monitor the situation for a day or two. But if within a couple of days they haven't regained a healthy, normal appetite, it's time to make an appointment with the vet to check into potential underlying reasons for kitty's loss of interest in eating.

 

Aquarium Fish Diseases.

By Redstone Promotional Communications / Circkles.com

Most aquarium fish diseases are caused by one of three things: wrong pH balance, dirty water or temperature changes. One thing to always remember before treating your tank is to remove activated carbon filters before administering any treatments or the carbon filtration will absorb any medications and not treat the fish.

Symptoms or Signs of Ick:
• Spots that resemble grains of salt or white sand on the skin.
• May be slightly-raised. 
• Scratching against objects due to irritated skin
• Clamped fins.
• Gasping at the water’s surface.
Cause:
Usually attacks fish that are stressed, which can be caused by factors including rapid temperature and pH fluctuations.
 
Treatment:
Tetra Ick Guard®. Use one tablet per 10 gallons, remove activated carbon and repeat after 24 hours; conduct a partial water change between treatments. Repeat until symptoms clear. Secondary infections are also common and can be treated with antibiotics or general cures likeLifeguard® or Fungus Guard®. Consistent temperature and good water quality will help prevent infections, in addition to using aquarium salt.

Symptoms or Signs of Ragged Tail Fin:
• A progressive deterioration of the tail and/or fins.
• Fins become frayed or their color may fade. 
Cause:
A bacterial infection may cause this tail and fin rot in susceptible fish—those who are bullied or injured by fin-nipping tank mates—especially in aquariums with poor conditions.

Treatment:
First test the aquarium water to review overall water quality and conduct a partial water change to ensure healthy conditions. If the clamped fins are the result of infections, a multipurpose treatment like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard® is the first line of treatment. Good practice of adding 1 tbs. aquarium salt per gallon will help prevent clamped fins. 

Symptoms or Signs of Tail, Fin and Mouth Rot:
• A progressive deterioration of the tail and/or fins.
• Fins become frayed or their color may fade.
Cause:
A bacterial infection may cause tail, fin and mouth rot in susceptible fish—those who are bullied or injured by fin-nipping tank mates—especially in aquariums with poor conditions.

Treatment:
First test the aquarium water to review overall water quality and conduct a partial water change to ensure healthy conditions. If the clamped fins are the result of infections, a multipurpose treatment like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard® is the first line of treatment. Good practice of adding 1 tbs. aquarium salt per gallon will help prevent clamped fins. 

Symptoms or Signs of Fungus
• Initially, you’ll notice a gray or whitish growth in and on the skin and/or fins.
• Untreated fungus resembles a cottony growth. 
• Eventually, as fungus continues to eat away at the fish’s body, the fish will die.
Cause:
Fish who develop fungus are already in a vulnerable state, the result of other serious health problems or attacks, such as parasites, a physical injury or a bacterial infection.

Treatment:
Many bacterial infections are misdiagnosed as fungal, so common medications include both a fungicide and antibiotics. Tetra Fungus Guard® contains malachite green and formalin; treat one tablet per 10 gallons once every 4 days until symptoms are gone. Remove activated carbon and conduct partial water changes in between treatments.

*Always remove activated carbon before administering any treatments.

 

© 2013 Redstone Promotional Communications / Circkles.com. All rights reserved to images and articles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pets who look like their owners:


Find more pet articles in our Archives, and pet home remedies in The Hangout.

Pet Remedies: Prorrhoea in Cats.

A disease caused by tartar buildup on a cats teeth is called prorrhoea. The tartar pushes the gums away from the tooth exposing the roots. If infection gets into the tooth socket, inflammation, loose teeth and digestive problems can occur.

In nature, a cat's teeth are kept clean of tartar by eating small bones and raw meat. Too much soft food causes deterioration of tooth and gum health.

Small raw bones such as chicken necks are good for cats, but make sure to only give raw bones. Cooked bones become brittle and can splinter and cause injury to an animals mouth and digestive track. Chicken necks when raw are very flexible and small enough for a cat. Hard biscuits can also clean the teeth if you do not feel comfortable with feeding bones, but remember, cats eat mice; bones and all.

Featured Monthly DOG BREED: Characteristics and Concerns. (We will get to cat breeds later.)

Beauceron:

A French herding breed known for centuries in western Europe, the Beauceron is one of the breeds used to create the Doberman Pinscher.
The Beauceron is known in France as a guard dog, a helper around the farm (herding sheep or cattle), and/or a ring sport dog (primarily protection training). This athletic, healthy and long-lived breed has been bred to be intelligent, calm, gentle, and fearless. Adults are typically suspicious of strangers and are excellent natural guard dogs. On the other hand they typically take their cue from their handlers when it comes to greeting strangers, and are neither sharp nor shy. They do best when raised within the family but they can sleep outside, the better to act as guards (their weatherproof coats make them ideal outdoor dogs even in the coldest winters). They are eager learners and can be trained to a high level. However, their physical and mental development is slow, relative to other similar breeds (e.g. German and other large shepherds): they are not mentally or physically mature until the age of about three years, so their training should not be rushed. Several five- or ten-minute play-training exercises per day in the early years can achieve better results than long or rigorous training sessions.
Although most breeds may or may not have dewclaws one notable feature of the Beauceron is the double dewclaws on the hind legs.
The Beauceron has a hard outer coat and a woolly undercoat that grows thick in cold weather, especially if the dog sleeps outdoors. Its standard coloring is black and tan (the latter color referred to in French as rouge ecureil, squirrel-red) or grey, black and tan called harlequin or merle in English, harlequin in French. Other colors, such as the once prevalent tawny, grey or grey/black, are now banned by the breed standard.

Lifespan: 10-13 years.

Health: The Beauceron is generally a healthy, hardy breed. Some lines are prone to bloat and like any breed over 40 pounds, Beaucerons are prone to hip dysplasia. Ninety-five percent of all breeders in the U.S. breed only hip certified stock.

Size: This breed stands 61 to 70 cm (24 to 27.5 inches) in height and weighs 30 to 45 kg (66 to 100 pounds).

Looking for a Beauceron? Use our Pet finder tool below and search for an adoptable dog that needs a home in your area now.

To view breeds we've already written about, view our Dog Breeds on The Hangout. (Must be a Circkles member to view The Hangout.)

 

 

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