FAA Licensed Drone (UAS) Pilot

Flying a drone is not as easy as most people think.

I have flown and shot aerials for the most challenging and hazardous environment there is – construction sites. I’m often flying around tower cranes while huge earth moving equipment is running all over the site around me doing their job. Not only do I have to be constantly conscious of where I am putting the drone but I also have to be ever vigilant as to if I am about to get run over by heavy equipment.

Most of the amateurs I have seen use a drone believe all there is to one is getting it up in the air without crashing it. They fail to realize how technical the photography aspect of drone flying is. A drone is not a toy aircraft to play with – for that they should get a model plane. A drone is first and foremost a flying camera. People usually make the mistake of considering the photography aspect of drone flight the last thing they think of and learn, when, in fact, it has to be the first. One can’t just consider the mechanics of flying, one has to consider how to use those mechanics to achieve the photographic results they want. A drone photographer is essentially flying a camera up in the air with the only means of operating the shutter, lens and exposure being a remote control unit. That part of being a drone pilot is more tech-challenging than flying the machine is.

drone photo cheese factory in Wisconsin
Springhill Suites Madison.JPG
Baraboo drone photographer
crane assembly on construction site
drone photography